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OJVRTM
Online Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume 16 (4):195-203, 2012. Extensively redacted 2017.


Body temperature in horses, cattle, sheep and goats measured by mercury, digital and non-contact infrared thermometers.

 

Pourjafar M*, Badiei K, Chalmeh AA, Rahmani Shahraki AR, Naghib M

 

Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran.

 

ABSTRACT

 

Pourjafar M, Badiei K, Chalmeh AA, Rahmani Shahraki AR, Naghib M., Body temperature in horses, cattle, sheep and goats measured by mercury, digital and non-contact infrared thermometers, Online J Vet Res., 16 (4):195-203, 2012. Temperatures were measured in groups of 50 (25 male and 25 female) healthy DareShuri horses, Holstein cattle, Karakul sheep and Najdi goats. Rectal and vaginal temperatures were taken with medical and veterinary mercury and digital rectal, and non-contact infrared thermometers. Regression curves for veterinary mercury rectal and infrared thermometers were y= -0.021x+38.32, y= 0.061x+36.3, y= -0.199x+47.41 and y= -0.022x+38.89 for horse, cattle, sheep and goat, respectively where y= veterinary mercury rectal and x= infrared thermometers. Infrared detected temperatures in cows (38.10.6oC) and goats (39.10.7oC) were significantly lower compared with other methods, but in horses (37.40.2oC) and sheep (39.40.3oC) were not different. We report reference values for body temperature detected by traditional and infrared thermometers for large animal practice. The regression plots could be used to convert infrared to rectal temperatures.

 

Keywords: Body temperature; Rectal thermometers; Non-contact infrared thermometer; Large animal practice.


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