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OJVRTM

 

Online Journal of Veterinary Research

 

 Volume 22 (5):382-392, 2018.


 

In vitro and in vivo (rats) effect of pomegranate seed oil compared with ciprofloxacin

on pathogenic E. coli ICC 223 isolated from cattle with diarrhea.

Reham N. Abdulridha and Orooba M.S. Ibrahim.

 

Dept. of Physiology & Pharmacology - College of Veterinary Medicine, Baghdad University, Iraq.

 

ABSTRACT

 

Abdulridha RN, Ibrahim MS., In vitro and in vivo (rats) effect of pomegranate seed oil compared with ciprofloxacin on pathogenic E. coli ICC 223 isolated from cattle with diarrhea. Onl J Vet Res., 22 (5):382-392, 2018. We report In vitro and In Vivo effect in rats of pomegranate seed oil compared with ciprofloxacin on pathogenic E. coli ICC 223 isolated from diarrheic calves. In vitro antibacterial effect of 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 mg/ml pomegranate seed oil and ciprofloxacin (mcg/ml) were tested by agar well diffusion with a 0.1 ml sterilized distilled water control. In Vivo, groups of 8 rats each were infected and treated orally with 200 or 400 mg/kg pomegranate seed oil or 14.28 mg/kg of ciprofloxacin for 7 days. Controls were infected but not treated or not infected but given distilled water for 7 days. In vitro E. coli was more sensitive to pomegranate seed oil compared with ciprofloxacin. In vivo 400 mg/kg BW seed oil and 14.28 mg/kg ciprofloxacin reduced E. coli count to normal by 7 days. Results suggest that 400mg/kg pomegranate seed oil at dose 400 mg/kg inhibited pathogenic E Coli. We surmise that this was due to secondary metabolites in pomegranate known to have antibacterial activity.

 

Key word: Pomagrate, ciproflaxin, rats, E. coli ICC 223, diarrhea, calves.


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