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OJVRTM

 

Online Journal of Veterinary Research

(Including Medical and Laboratory Research)

Established 1994

ISSN 1328-925X

 

Volume 28(6): 371-381, 2024.


Prevalence of mycobacteria avium and paratuberculosis in sheep and goats (Greece).

 

Ikonomopoulos JA, Gazouli M, Louka J, Kominaki A, Katzoura B.

 

Agricultural University of Athens, Faculty of Animal Science, Department of Anatomy and Physiology, Athens, Greece.

 

ABSTRACT

 

Ikonomopoulos JA, Gazouli M, Louka J, Kominaki A, Katzoura B., Prevalence of mycobacteria avium and paratuberculosis in sheep and goats, Onl J Vet Res., 28(6): 371-381, 2024. Author reports prevalence of Mycobacterium avium and M. paratuberculosis in heparinized blood of 291 sheep from 19 flocks and 117 goats from 11 flocks in Greece determined by PCR. We found 21% samples and 90% of sheep and goat flocks tested positive. PCR-positive ranged 0-9% (IS900), 0-18% (IS1245) and 0-36% (IS6110) for sheep, and 0-14% (IS900), 0-5% (IS1245) and 0-42% (IS6110) for goats. Cumulative PCR-positive tests per farm ranged from 0-63% for sheep, and 0-53% for goats but only 2/30 produced negative results to all the tests employed in this study. The results presented here indicate that the local small ruminant population may be tolerant to certain types of mycobacterial infections that remain clinically silent.

 

Key words: tuberculosis of sheep and goats, polymerase chain reaction.


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